LafargeHolcim Foundation Knowledge Turntable for Sustainable Construction
Media

Images

Images

2480 x 3864 px
2480 x 3864 px
The zabbaleen collect and sort the refuse and then process the materials with machines purchased with a loan from Oxfam. Here, plastic waste gets crushed into pellets that are later sold to manufacturers.
599 x 403 px
599 x 403 px
The zabbaleen recycle 80 percent of the collected refuse.
1228 x 827 px
1228 x 827 px
Here, plastic waste is sorted by color and then washed before being further processed.
2048 x 1536 px
2048 x 1536 px
La Punt-Chamues-ch, a rural community in the Swiss Alps, wants to attract young people from the tech industry. Photo: Rolf Canal.
7441 x 4966 px
7441 x 4966 px
A multifunctional ceiling made from two and a half million petals. One in five has an LED light source and each works acoustically. It also heats or cools the building according to the weather conditions. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
7441 x 4966 px
7441 x 4966 px
With this approach, the temperature in the center of Masdar can be reduced to 33˚C. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
2833 x 2049 px
2833 x 2049 px
It was completed twenty years ago and won’t require any maintenance for the next hundred years. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
2500 x 2716 px
2500 x 2716 px
Design inspirations: traditional windows recessed in deep walls and painted white to pull in more light through the small openings, and paintings by Swiss artist Matthias Becher that combine the local architecture and the mountains. Photo: Foster + Partners.
4100 x 2724 px
4100 x 2724 px
The ten-megawatt solar field powering Masdar produces about twice as much energy as the new city consumes. Photo: Oliver Jackson.
3024 x 3024 px
3024 x 3024 px
Design inspirations: traditional windows recessed in deep walls and painted white to pull in more light through the small openings, and paintings by Swiss artist Matthias Becher that combine the local architecture and the mountains. Photo: Foster + Partners.
8268 x 5512 px
8268 x 5512 px
The idea of Apple Park was not only to build headquarters but also to re-create a landscape. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
2394 x 1717 px
2394 x 1717 px
La Punt-Chamues-ch, a rural community in the Swiss Alps, wants to attract young people from the tech industry. Photo: Rolf Canal.
8268 x 5512 px
8268 x 5512 px
A multifunctional ceiling made from two and a half million petals. One in five has an LED light source and each works acoustically. It also heats or cools the building according to the weather conditions. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
2921 x 2016 px
2921 x 2016 px
The perforated screens of the facades provide sun protection, while their shape and ornamentation refer to the local context. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
7441 x 4961 px
7441 x 4961 px
The building’s facades are made from bronze and stone. Fifty percent of them also filter the incoming air. Photo: Aaron Hargreaves / Foster + Partners.
1500 x 1002 px
1500 x 1002 px
When inside the circle, the building almost evaporates into the background. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
5000 x 3240 px
5000 x 3240 px
A large indoor space is the equivalent of a village square within the building.
4064 x 2543 px
4064 x 2543 px
Design inspirations: traditional windows recessed in deep walls and painted white to pull in more light through the small openings, and paintings by Swiss artist Matthias Becher that combine the local architecture and the mountains. Photo: Foster + Partners.
1500 x 1000 px
1500 x 1000 px
The building adapts to the historical context by using local stone. Photo: Aaron Hargreaves / Foster + Partners.
7441 x 4966 px
7441 x 4966 px
Like in old cities in a desert climate, Masdar has small shady streets and courtyards with vegetation to create a cooler microclimate. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
7441 x 4966 px
7441 x 4966 px
The facade of this residential building in Switzerland is made from local larch shingles. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
1744 x 981 px
1744 x 981 px
Mountain-like volumes made from local material create a protective perimeter.
1500 x 1002 px
1500 x 1002 px
The materials of the building were determined by the historical city context. To be a good neighbor to the seventeenth-century Christopher Wren church and the Magistrates’ Court, local stone was chosen for the material. Photo: Nigel Young / Foster + Partners.
2784 x 1856 px
2784 x 1856 px
Luisa Pastore, Coordinator of the Academic Committee, LafargeHolcim Foundation.
2694 x 1796 px
2694 x 1796 px
Marilyne Andersen, Full Professor of Sustainable Construction Technologies and Head of the Laboratory of Integrated Performance in Design (LIPID) at the EPFL in Lausanne; Head of the Academic Committee of the LafargeHolcim Foundation; and was a member of all regional LafargeHolcim Awards juries in 2020.
2704 x 1803 px
2704 x 1803 px
Edward Schwarz, General Manager, LafargeHolcim Foundation.
2704 x 1803 px
2704 x 1803 px
Philippe Block, Professor of Architecture & Structure, Department of Architecture, ETH Zurich; Member of the Academic Committee, LafargeHolcim Foundation; Member of the the Board, LafargeHolcim Ltd; and member of the Awards jury for region Asia Pacific in 2020.
800 x 566 px
800 x 566 px
100 hours online to evaluate 2,000 entries: Members of the five regional jury sessions had to be conducted virtually for the first time.
5387 x 3591 px
5387 x 3591 px
Touring the LafargeHolcim Eclépens cement plant (l-r): Awards jury members Philippe Block and Marilyne Andersen with plant manager François Girod pictured before changing into PPE and entering the manufacturing plant which sets international benchmarks for sustainability.
2048 x 1536 px
2048 x 1536 px
Discussing cement microscopy and manufacturing technology (l-r): Awards jury members Marilyne Andersen and Philippe Block with plant manager François Girod.
2048 x 1536 px
2048 x 1536 px
Pictured in the control room of the LafargeHolcim Eclépens cement plant (l-r): Awards jury members Marilyne Andersen and Philippe Block.
5568 x 3712 px
5568 x 3712 px
Touring the LafargeHolcim Eclépens cement plant (l-r): Awards jury members Philippe Block and Marilyne Andersen with plant manager François Girod pictured before changing into PPE and entering the manufacturing plant which sets international benchmarks for sustainability.
5568 x 3712 px
5568 x 3712 px
Evaluating submissions in the LafargeHolcim Awards for region Asia Pacific: Philippe Block, Professor of Architecture and Structure at the ETH Zurich, and newly elected member of the Board of Directors of LafargeHolcim Ltd.
4572 x 3439 px
4572 x 3439 px
The Awards jury meeting for region Asia Pacific was coordinated via Eclépens, Switzerland and included jury members located in Bangkok, Thailand; Berlin, Germany; Boston, USA; Lausanne and Zurich, Switzerland; London, United Kingdom; Lyon, France, and Singapore.
2048 x 1072 px
2048 x 1072 px
Members of the LafargeHolcim Awards jury for Asia Pacific headed by Nirmal Kishnani are online in five time zones – from Singapore (+6hrs) to Boston (-6hrs) – to select the most outstanding projects and visions in sustainable construction.
1875 x 985 px
1875 x 985 px
Members of the #LafargeHolcimAwards jury for Middle East Africa headed by Mariam Kamara are online in four time zones to select the most outstanding projects and visions in sustainable construction.
1875 x 985 px
1875 x 985 px
Another regional LafargeHolcim Awards jury meeting is taking place as a two-day online session coordinated out of Switzerland. The jury for Latin America includes members in four time zones. They will nominate the most outstanding projects and visions as winners of the 6th LafargeHolcim Awards for Sustainable Construction.
2590 x 1948 px
2590 x 1948 px
The Awards jury meeting for region Asia Pacific was coordinated via Eclépens, Switzerland and included jury members located in Bangkok, Thailand; Berlin, Germany; Boston, USA; Lausanne and Zurich, Switzerland; London, United Kingdom; Lyon, France, and Singapore.
1818 x 1228 px
1818 x 1228 px
During events, the restaurant terrace turns into seating for the audience. Photo: Katalin Deér.
4096 x 2741 px
4096 x 2741 px
The sofa area and fireplace inside the restaurant. Photo: Herzog & de Meuron.
878 x 1317 px
878 x 1317 px
The concrete slab of the terrace stands out from the mountain and the sloping roof shape follows the incline of the surroundings. The building cantilevers over the narrow ridge on which it stands. Photo: Katalin Deér.
7016 x 4961 px
7016 x 4961 px
Permeable low buildings line the block and enclose an intimate public courtyard. Photo: Herzog & de Meuron.
2481 x 3508 px
2481 x 3508 px
The load-bearing structure is primarily concrete, while the patients’ rooms and facade are made of timber. Photo: Herzog & de Meuron.
3000 x 2341 px
3000 x 2341 px
In 1912, Larwill Park appears as an empty area surrounded by a dense fabric of three-story wooden buildings. Today, it is one of the last open spaces in downtown Vancouver. The site’s historical use ranged from parade grounds to a place for political demonstrations to a hub for cultural and sports events. Photo: Welford Herbert.
4241 x 3024 px
4241 x 3024 px
Structural additions to the existing building. Photo: Herzog & de Meuron.
3000 x 2250 px
3000 x 2250 px
With the building’s main elements in concrete (columns, elevators, vertical distribution), the structure allows for flexibility, which was a demand of the client’s, both during planning and once the building is in use. Photo: Herzog & de Meuron.
4000 x 2500 px
4000 x 2500 px
Glass is used for most weather-exposed parts of the facade. Wood is used on the ground floor – the large “teeth” or “pillows” on the underside of the recessed terraces — and for the areas of the skin that are better protected against rain. Photo: Herzog & de Meuron.
4838 x 3225 px
4838 x 3225 px
Existing cable-car station with restaurant, originally built in 1972, on the summit of Chäserrugg, 2262 meters above sea level.
1616 x 2422 px
1616 x 2422 px
The depth of the facade and the perpendicular wooden lattice walls create privacy for the treatment rooms on the ground floor. On the upper floor, each patient’s room has its own roof. Photo: Herzog & de Meuron.
1181 x 787 px
1181 x 787 px
Ascent to the new summit station. The large roof connects new and existing elements. Photo: Katalin Deér.
Load more
Other New Media & Downloads
News
Circularity – Informal and Socially Constructed

A global discourse on materials must address the issue of the harvesting and repurposing of waste. Traditional waste management systems in the Global South are embedded in realities that are often too complex for systems based on the…

Latest Publication
Latest Video
CID Consulting & Nestlé Reverse Credit Program

The reverse credit program has been rolled out in the six largest recycling neighborhoods in Cairo – which recycle …

LafargeHolcim Foundation
 
     

Search Help

Our website search engine covers the web pages including project descriptions and expert profiles, PDFs, images and videos on the LafargeHolcim Foundation website. To improve your search results, here are some tips:

Basic search

Our search defaults to term-pairing AND. If you search sustainable construction - then the search engine will look for any items containing sustainable AND construction

Union

photovoltaic OR solar

Looks for either word

Nesting

(clay OR mud) AND (school OR university)

Combine alternative terms for more specific searching

Subtraction

geothermal -heating

Excludes a term from results, automatically ANDs other terms listed

Phrases

"zero carbon"

Use quotation marks to search for a specific phrase or combination

Wildcards (one or more characters)

archit*

Asterisk (*) matches any word or phrase - so archit* will find architect, architecture, architectural as well as architrave