LafargeHolcim Foundation Knowledge Turntable for Sustainable Construction
Media

Images

Images

6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
Parque Hídrico Quebradora aims to reintroduce water into the city’s visible realm by understanding its current natural, urban, economic, social, and political conditions.
6016 x 3376 px
6016 x 3376 px
By interweaving water management with public amenities, the project reintroduces water to the civic realm.
4864 x 3648 px
4864 x 3648 px
A total of 68,000 m3 of runoff per year is treated with the system – a third more than the site could previously handle.
4864 x 3648 px
4864 x 3648 px
The retaining walls and most of the other elements in the park are built out of volcanic stone – a reference to the site itself, which is situated on volcanic rock.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
The project directly engages people with water by understanding its cycle and the potentialities that the landscape has to regulate storms and treat wastewater.
9933 x 5587 px
9933 x 5587 px
Until not too long ago, it was used as a regulatory basin for floodwater management. More recently, the parcel was neglected and gradually became a mere patch of fenced-off wasteland.
5008 x 3336 px
5008 x 3336 px
The wastewater will be treated through a combined system: aerobic treatment plant and a sub-superficial wetland for its later use in public toilets, irrigation, and to fill water pipes for the region. Power comes from 208 solar panels producing 54 KWh.
4930 x 2773 px
4930 x 2773 px
“A great opportunity to combine our different fields of knowledge” – Manuel Perló Cohen
3000 x 2250 px
3000 x 2250 px
Two roads serve as channels during storms, carrying the runoff water to Quebradora. There the water seeps through a series of screens and filters into two previously existing infiltration basins in the northern part of the park.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
Low basins host wetlands and provide storage capacity to mitigate flooding during heavy rainfall.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
“Our project can only reduce the problem” – Loreta Castro Reguera
5008 x 3336 px
5008 x 3336 px
Built from the region’s volcanic rock by molding the site through a series of platforms and contentions walls, the hope is for the project to last for centuries to come, mingling with the place.
2048 x 1536 px
2048 x 1536 px
Parque Hídrico Quebradora is situated on a hillside, so the project consists of a series of terraced platforms with containment walls.
3801 x 2534 px
3801 x 2534 px
Global LafargeHolcim Awards Gold 2018 winners (l-r): Manuel Perló, Researcher at the Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and Loreta Castro Reguera, Director, Taller Capital.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
La Quebradora gets its name from the site: a place of broken stone. Its position on the hillside enables water to naturally infiltrate the ground.
1920 x 1079 px
1920 x 1079 px
The LEED Platinum design works with Mexico City’s temperate, dry climate to fill the terminal spaces with fresh air using displacement ventilation principles. For a large part of the year, comfortable temperatures will be maintained by almost 100% outside air, with little or no additional heating or cooling required. Photo courtesy: Foster + Partners.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
The mushroom-shaped pillars of the new airport are virtually growing out of the enormous concrete floor plate.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
The mushroom-shaped pillars of the new airport are virtually growing out of the enormous concrete floor plate.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
Explanations on the spot: LafargeHolcim Awards hand-over attendees were informed on site about the challenges and innovation behind the ongoing construction work.
1920 x 1079 px
1920 x 1079 px
At 743,000 square metres, the new airport will be one of the world’s largest – the entire terminal is enclosed within a continuous lightweight gridshell, embracing walls and roof in a single, flowing form, evocative of flight. Photo courtesy: Foster + Partners.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
Guests of the LafargeHolcim Foundation on the construction site where the passenger terminal buildings of the new airport of Mexico City will be in operation from 2020.
1920 x 1079 px
1920 x 1079 px
The design ensures short walking distances and few level changes, it is easy to navigate, and passengers will not have to use internal trains or underground tunnels – it is a celebration of space and light. Photo courtesy: Foster + Partners.
5792 x 3920 px
5792 x 3920 px
Board of the LafargeHolcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction (l-r): Stuart Smith, Jens Diebold, Maria Atkinson, Harry Gugger, Enrique Norten, Marilyne Andersen, Marc Angélil, and Roland Köhler. Not pictured: Alejandro Aravena, Jan Jenisch and Brinda Somaya.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
The local government is pushing for the publicly accessible water park project to be completed soon.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
View from what will become a social space for residents and visitors to “La Quebradora”.
From left: Young professionals Anna Andronova, Tzu-Jung Huang, project author Loreta Castro, student reporter Lia Leutenegger, member of the Academic Committee Dirk Hebel, and student Danna Rasyad Pryiatna at the “La Quebradora” construction site.
5008 x 3336 px
5008 x 3336 px
Exploring La Quebradora water park: Former Next Generation Awards prize winners with Dirk Hebel, member of the Academic committee of the LafargeHolcim Foundation (yellow hard hat).
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
Project author Loreta Castro explaining how great amounts of earth had to be moved in order to make use of the gravitational flow of water.
4828 x 3223 px
4828 x 3223 px
Announcement of LafargeHolcim Research in Practice Grant recipients by Marilyne Andersen and Harry Gugger, both members of the Board of the LafargeHolcim Foundation and professors at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL Lausanne). From left: Heidi Boulanger (van Eeden), Nada Nafeh, and Stefano Romagnoli and Juan Cruz.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
The water treatment basins are ready, the buildings and landscaping to complete the section are still ongoing.
1280 x 720 px
1280 x 720 px
LafargeHolcim Awards Lab 2018 Mexico City
4270 x 2845 px
4270 x 2845 px
Loreta Castro guided the international guests through the construction site, explaining the ongoing work and the benefits of the project for the community.
1280 x 720 px
1280 x 720 px
“Hydropuncture” – La Quebradora Hydraulic Park
3999 x 2670 px
3999 x 2670 px
Announcement of LafargeHolcim Research in Practice Grant recipients by Marilyne Andersen and Harry Gugger, both members of the Board of the LafargeHolcim Foundation and professors at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL Lausanne). From left: Heidi Boulanger (van Eeden), Nada Nafeh, and Stefano Romagnoli and Juan Cruz.
3000 x 1998 px
3000 x 1998 px
Loreta Castro guided the international guests through the construction site, explaining the ongoing work and the benefits of the project for the community.
3999 x 2670 px
3999 x 2670 px
As part of the Global LafargeHolcim Awards handover program in Mexico City, guests were invited to visit the main winning project – a publicly accessible water retention and treatment complex “La Quebradora.”
3999 x 2670 px
3999 x 2670 px
Photo stop on the tour of the water park, which is nearing completion.
1906 x 1272 px
1906 x 1272 px
Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018 Bronze winner Constance C. Bodurow, Director, studio[Ci], Detroit, USA.
3951 x 2634 px
3951 x 2634 px
Global LafargeHolcim Awards 2018 winners (l-r): Bronze – Eric Mahoney and Constance Bodurow, studio[Ci], USA; Gold – Loreta Castro, Taller Capital and Manuel Perló, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico; and Silver – Mariam Kamara, Atelier Masomi, Niger and Yasaman Esmaili, Studio Chahar, Iran.
713 x 713 px
713 x 713 px
Carlos Delgado, Faculty of Architecture, Universidad Iberoamericana (IBERO), Mexico City, Mexico
4426 x 2954 px
4426 x 2954 px
Roland Köhler, Chairman, Board of the LafargeHolcim Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland at the LafargeHolcim Next Generation Awards Lab 2018 held at IBERO in Mexico City.
3376 x 2236 px
3376 x 2236 px
Tomás Pont Apóstolo, National University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina
4328 x 2889 px
4328 x 2889 px
Ghaith Abi Ghanem, GHAITH&JAD Architecture and Design, Beirut, Lebanon
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
Harry Gugger, Professor for Architectural & Urban Design, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland; and member of the Board and the Academic Committee (AC), LafargeHolcim Foundation at the L-Lab which explored sustainable strategies for developments that are normally unsustainable, whether at the scale of cities or regions.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
Frédéric Bouvier, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland presenting at the XL-Lab, which explored the mutations required for, the disciplines at work in the production of territory at the all-encompassing scale of the planet.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
S-Lab – as the saying goes, “small is beautiful”.
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
The XL-Lab accordingly explored the mutations required for the disciplines at work in the production of territory at the all-encompassing scale of the planet.
4345 x 2901 px
4345 x 2901 px
Georgina Baronian, Princeton University, School of Architecture, Princeton, NJ, USA
6016 x 4016 px
6016 x 4016 px
S-Lab focused on the role of construction details: Dolathep Chetty, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand presents to the workshop.
3636 x 2427 px
3636 x 2427 px
Malgorzata Mader, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland
Load more
Other New Media & Downloads
News
The shaping of water

Regarding water, Mexico City is struggling with a paradoxical situation: On one hand, there is a shortage of drinking water – and on the other, torrential downpours flood the streets every year. Parque Hídrico Quebradora is designed to…

Latest Publication
Latest Video
Project introduction in Spanish: “Hydropuncture” – La Quebradora Hydraulic Park

Water is in shortage and overabundance in Mexico City. This short video in Spanish introduces the Global LafargeHolcim …

LafargeHolcim Foundation
 
     

Search Help

Our website search engine covers the web pages including project descriptions and expert profiles, PDFs, images and videos on the LafargeHolcim Foundation website. To improve your search results, here are some tips:

Basic search

Our search defaults to term-pairing AND. If you search sustainable construction - then the search engine will look for any items containing sustainable AND construction

Union

photovoltaic OR solar

Looks for either word

Nesting

(clay OR mud) AND (school OR university)

Combine alternative terms for more specific searching

Subtraction

geothermal -heating

Excludes a term from results, automatically ANDs other terms listed

Phrases

"zero carbon"

Use quotation marks to search for a specific phrase or combination

Wildcards (one or more characters)

archit*

Asterisk (*) matches any word or phrase - so archit* will find architect, architecture, architectural as well as architrave