LafargeHolcim Foundation International Awards for Sustainable Construction
Regional Holcim Awards 2014
North America

Regional Holcim Awards 2014 North America

Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Winners of the Holcim Awards (l-r): David Benjamin, The Living, New York – winner of Holcim Awards Bronze for “Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure”; Caitlin Taylor and Amy Mielke, Water Pore Partnership, New York – winners of Holcim Awards Gold for “Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin”; and Kai-Uwe Bergmann – BIG Bjarke Ingels Group, New York and Matthijs Bouw - One Architecture, Amsterdam – members of the consortium winning Holcim Awards Silver for “Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure”.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Presentation of the Holcim Awards Gold 2014 for North America (l-r): Alain Bourguignon, Holcim Area Manager for North America and the United Kingdom; prize winners Caitlin Taylor and Amy Mielke, Water Pore Partnership, New York for “Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin”; Bernard Fontana, CEO Holcim Ltd; and jury member Mark Jarzombek, Associate Dean, School of Architecture & Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Presenting the Holcim Awards Silver (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; Kai-Uwe Bergmann – BIG Bjarke Ingels Group, New York and Matthijs Bouw - One Architecture, Amsterdam – members of the consortium winning Holcim Awards Silver for “Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure”; Alain Bourguignon, Holcim Area Manager for North America and the United Kingdom; and jury member Mark Jarzombek, Associate Dean, School of Architecture & Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Presenting the Holcim Awards Bronze (l-r): Alexander Biner, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation; Alain Bourguignon, Holcim Area Manager for North America and the United Kingdom; David Benjamin, The Living, New York – winner of Holcim Awards Bronze for “Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure”; and jury member Mark Jarzombek, Associate Dean, School of Architecture & Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Presenting an Acknowledgement prize for “Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development” (l-r): Filiberto Ruiz, CEO Holcim and Aggregates Industries US; project client Collin Yip, RAFI Properties; Alexander Shelly, Sheila Kennedy and Frano Violich, Kennedy & Violich Architecture, Boston, USA; and jury member Lola Sheppard, Partner, Lateral Office, Toronto, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Presenting an Acknowledgement prize for “Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension” (l-r): Baudoin Nizet, CEO Holcim Canada; prize winners Katherine Faulkner and Nader Tehrani, NADAAA architects, Boston; Richard Sommer, Dean of John H Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design (DFALD), University of Toronto; and jury member Lola Sheppard, Partner, Lateral Office, Toronto, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Presenting an Acknowledgement prize for “Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning” (l-r): Filiberto Ruiz, CEO Holcim and Aggregates Industries US; prize winners Hadley & Peter Arnold, Arid Lands Institute, Woodbury University, Burbank, CA, USA; and jury member Lola Sheppard, Partner, Lateral Office, Toronto, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Presenting an Acknowledgement prize for “In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, USA” (l-r): Alain Bourguignon, Holcim Area Manager for North America and the United Kingdom; prize winners Paul Azzopardi, Noé Basch & Etienne Feher, ABF-lab, Paris, France; and jury member Lola Sheppard, Partner, Lateral Office, Toronto, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Winners of all four Acknowledgement prizes (l-r): Alain Bourguignon & Baudoin Nizet, Holcim; Collin Yip, RAFI Properties; Alexander Shelly, Sheila Kennedy & Frano Violich, Kennedy & Violich Architecture; Katherine Faulkner & Nader Tehrani, NADAAA architects; Richard Sommer, University of Toronto; Hadley & Peter Arnold, Arid Lands Institute; Paul Azzopardi, Noé Basch & Etienne Feher, ABF-lab; and Filiberto Ruiz, Holcim.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Congratulating “Next Generation” 1st prize winner for “Trash for use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, USA” (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; winner Debbie Chen, architect, Brooklyn, NY, USA; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Congratulating “Next Generation” 2nd prize winner for “Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA” (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; winner Kenya Endo, Atelier Dreiseitl asia, Singapore; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Congratulating “Next Generation” 3rd prize winner for “Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA” (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; winners Suk Lee & Beomki Lee, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Congratulating “Next Generation” 4th prize winner for “Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada” (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; winner Jonathan Enns, Enns Design/solidoperations, Toronto, Canada; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Congratulating “Next Generation” 5th prize winner for “Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, USA” (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; winners Mark Jongman-Sereno, Harvard University; Mira Irawan, New York University; David O’Brian, Iowa State University; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Congratulating “Next Generation” 6th prize winner for “Latex Formwork: Concrete Wall Panel Construction Method, Cambridge, MA, USA” (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; winner Namjoo Kim, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Congratulating all “Next Generation” prize winners (l-r): Enrique Norten, Member of the Board of the Holcim Foundation and Principal & Founder of TEN Arquitectos; Namjoo Kim, Suk Lee, Beomki Lee, Debbie Chen, Mira Irawan, Mark Jongman-Sereno, David O’Brian, Jonathan Enns, Kenya Endo; and jury member Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, JL Richards & Associates, Sudbury, Canada.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Introducing the Holcim Awards main prize winners – Mark Jarzombek, Associate Dean, School of Architecture & Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Member Holcim Awards jury 2014 North America.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Introducing the Holcim Awards Acknowledgement prize winners – Lola Sheppard, Partner at Lateral Office, Toronto; Winner Holcim Awards Gold 2011 North America; and Member Holcim Awards jury 2014 North America.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Introducing winners of the “Next Generation” category for young professionals and students – Jeffrey Laberge, Associate, J L Richards Architects, Sudbury; Winner Holcim Awards Bronze 2008 North America; and Member Holcim Awards jury 2014 North America.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Bernard Fontana, CEO Holcim Ltd, explained to guests how Holcim wants to use its position as a global industry leader and through the Holcim Awards competition to support sustainability beyond the Group’s plants and distribution chains.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
The Holcim Awards ceremony included the launch of Community-inspired housing in Canada, a book that illustrates the success of a former Holcim Awards winner and the evolution of how communities are designed and built. Master of Ceremonies, Dennis Trudeau (left) with book editor Daniel Pearl, Founding partner L’OEUF architects, Montreal; Founding member Canada Green Building Council; Winner global Holcim Awards Bronze 2006; and Winner Holcim Awards Gold North America 2005.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Keynote address by David Miller, President and CEO of WWF Canada; and former mayor of the City of Toronto.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Master of Ceremonies – Dennis Trudeau, presenter and journalist.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
The Holcim Awards poster gallery is a focal point for networking and learning about the winning projects from North America at the cutting edge of efficiency and innovation in sustainable construction.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
The prize-giving ceremony hosted at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto – a Holcim Awards prize winning project in 2008.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
The prize-giving ceremony hosted at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto – a Holcim Awards prize winning project in 2008.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
The prize-giving ceremony hosted at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto – a Holcim Awards prize winning project in 2008.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
The prize-giving ceremony hosted at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto – a Holcim Awards prize winning project in 2008 – included the launch of Community-inspired housing in Canada, a book that illustrates the success of a former Holcim Awards winner and the evolution of how communities are designed and built.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Toronto’s Zero Gravity Circus provided a spectacular intermission show featuring acrobats and aerialists: the perfect high-adrenaline performance before the Holcim Awards main prize winners were announced.
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America ceremony, Toronto, Canada
The Holcim Awards poster gallery is a focal point for networking and learning about the winning projects from North America at the cutting edge of efficiency and innovation in sustainable construction.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
“A system which can take up large amounts of water in a short time is highly relevant for all dense urban areas.” – Holcim Awards Gold 2014 for North America winners (l-r) Caitlin Taylor and Amy Mielke, Water Pore Partnership, New York for “Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas”.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
“We build resilient infrastructure - but we actually think about the people and their activities.” – member of the Holcim Awards Silver winning consortium Kai-Uwe Bergmann – BIG Bjarke Ingels Group for “Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York”.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
“This was a project to disappear as much as it was a project to appear.” – Holcim Awards Bronze winner David Benjamin, The Living, New York for “Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York”.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
“The entire project is about the maximal variety of possible use of the space.” – Holcim Awards Acknowledgement prize winners (l-r) Nader Tehrani and Katherine Faulkner, NADAAA architects, Boston for “Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto”.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
“Unified timber 'living boxes´ work in urban and remote construction.” – “Next Generation” 4th prize for North America winner Jonathan Enns, Enns Design/solidoperations, Toronto for “Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, Nunavut”.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
“The definition of the ‘target issues’ by the Foundation is one of the broadest and most enlightened definitions of sustainability.” – Lola Sheppard, Partner at Lateral Office, Toronto; Winner Holcim Awards Gold 2011 North America; and Member Holcim Awards jury 2014 North America.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Bernard Fontana, CEO Holcim Ltd, explained to more than 40 participants at the media briefing how Holcim wants to use its position as a global industry leader and through the Holcim Awards competition to support sustainability beyond the Group’s plants and distribution chains.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
“No project can achieve a top score in all five of the ‘target issues’ for sustainable construction – every project has a particular focus on its intrinsically unique aspects.” – Edward Schwarz, General Manager of the Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction.
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America media briefing, Toronto, Canada
Media representatives from across North America attended a media briefing following the Holcim Awards 2014 North America prize-giving ceremony. The winning projects of the Holcim Awards 2014 for North America are at the cutting edge of efficiency and innovation in sustainable construction.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The walking tour explored the history of The Distillery Historic District from its foundation in 1832 to present day. Topics include prohibition, working conditions, building uses, alcohol production, successes/failures, the area’s gentrification, and more.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The Toronto Distillery District is a national Historic Site and represents the largest and best preserved collection of Victorian Industrial Architecture in North America.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Formerly known as The Gooderham and Worts Distillery, this site has played an important role in the growth and wealth of both Toronto and Canada.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
An internationally acclaimed pedestrian-only village, The Distillery features more than 70 ground-floor cultural and retail establishments in the restored red brick, Victorian-era buildings of the renowned Gooderham & Worts whiskey distillery.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Formerly known as The Gooderham and Worts Distillery, this site has played an important role in the growth and wealth of both Toronto and Canada.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The walking tour explored the history of The Distillery Historic District from its foundation in 1832 to present day. Topics include prohibition, working conditions, building uses, alcohol production, successes/failures, the area’s gentrification, and more.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
An internationally acclaimed pedestrian-only village, The Distillery features more than 70 ground-floor cultural and retail establishments in the restored red brick, Victorian-era buildings of the renowned Gooderham & Worts whiskey distillery.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The Toronto Distillery District is a national Historic Site and represents the largest and best preserved collection of Victorian Industrial Architecture in North America.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Toronto’s waterfront revitalization is one of Canada’s most exciting urban renewal projects, transforming 800 hectares of previously underused, underappreciated space into a priceless public asset accessible to everyone. Bringing together the most innovative approaches to sustainable development, excellence in urban design, real estate development and leading technology infrastructure, the project delivers on important public policy objectives.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The Toronto Waterfront tour showcased the collective efforts to date. Beginning in the East Bayfront Precinct, attendees toured Sherbourne Common, Corus Quay, George Brown College’s Waterfront Campus and Sugar Beach. Highlights include insight into the stormwater treatment and management system built into the Sherbourne Common pavilion.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The Toronto Waterfront tour included West Don Lands, site of Corktown Common, Underpass Park, River City, Toronto Community Housing Corporation’s (TCHC) newest buildings and the CIBC Pan Am/Parapan Am Athletes’ Village (under construction). Attendees will enjoy the beautiful views of Toronto’s skyline from the top of Corktown Common and will learn about the Flood Protection Landform on which the park is built – a novel engineering feature that provides flood protection to 210 hectares of downtown Toronto, including the financial district.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Toronto’s waterfront revitalization is one of Canada’s most exciting urban renewal projects, transforming 800 hectares of previously underused, underappreciated space into a priceless public asset accessible to everyone. Bringing together the most innovative approaches to sustainable development, excellence in urban design, real estate development and leading technology infrastructure, the project delivers on important public policy objectives.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The Toronto Waterfront tour showcased the collective efforts to date. Beginning in the East Bayfront Precinct, attendees toured Sherbourne Common, Corus Quay, George Brown College’s Waterfront Campus and Sugar Beach. Highlights include insight into the stormwater treatment and management system built into the Sherbourne Common pavilion.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The Toronto Waterfront tour included West Don Lands, site of Corktown Common, Underpass Park, River City, Toronto Community Housing Corporation’s (TCHC) newest buildings and the CIBC Pan Am/Parapan Am Athletes’ Village (under construction). Attendees will enjoy the beautiful views of Toronto’s skyline from the top of Corktown Common and will learn about the Flood Protection Landform on which the park is built – a novel engineering feature that provides flood protection to 210 hectares of downtown Toronto, including the financial district.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Toronto’s waterfront revitalization is one of Canada’s most exciting urban renewal projects, transforming 800 hectares of previously underused, underappreciated space into a priceless public asset accessible to everyone. Bringing together the most innovative approaches to sustainable development, excellence in urban design, real estate development and leading technology infrastructure, the project delivers on important public policy objectives.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
The Toronto Waterfront tour showcased the collective efforts to date. Beginning in the East Bayfront Precinct, attendees toured Sherbourne Common, Corus Quay, George Brown College’s Waterfront Campus and Sugar Beach. Highlights include insight into the stormwater treatment and management system built into the Sherbourne Common pavilion.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Guests enjoyed the view from CN Tower, the tallest free-standing structure in the Western Hemisphere, a signature icon of Toronto's skyline.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Guests enjoyed the view from CN Tower, the tallest free-standing structure in the Western Hemisphere, a signature icon of Toronto's skyline.
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America 2014, second day program, Toronto, Canada
Guests enjoyed the view from CN Tower, the tallest free-standing structure in the Western Hemisphere, a signature icon of Toronto's skyline.
Holcim Awards North America farewell event, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America farewell event, Toronto, Canada
Filiberto Ruiz, CEO Holcim and Aggregates Industries US congratulates winners and thanks all attendees for being part of the 4th Holcim Awards ceremony for North America.
Holcim Awards North America farewell event, Toronto, Canada
Holcim Awards North America farewell event, Toronto, Canada
Baudoin Nizet, CEO Holcim Canada as host of the 4th Holcim Awards ceremony thanks everyone who contributed to making the event in Toronto a resounding success, and wishes those returning home a safe journey.
2014 Holcim Awards jury for North America
2014 Holcim Awards jury for North America
The Holcim Awards jury for region North America met in Cambridge, MA, USA in June 2014 to select projects using the “target issues” for sustainable construction (l-r): Dana Cuff, Jeffrey Laberge, Marc Angélil, Toshiko Mori (Head of Jury), Sarah Whiting, Guillaume Habert, Lola Sheppard, Alain Bourguignon and Mark Jarzombek (seated).
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Target locations: remote areas and situations needing speedy construction (such as disaster relief).
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
System: the two examples represented use the same four building blocks: a bachelor unit, a one bedroom unit, a two/three bedroom unit, and an egress unit. These base units are constructed from combinations of the same floor, wall, ceiling, kitchen, and WC modules. Contrary to this maximum level of prefabrication and modularity, at the level of the assembly, the system is intended to flex and adapt to site particularities through deformation in plan and differences in stacking height.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Remote building: the first example is located in Cape Dorset, Nunavut, located high in the Canadian North. While Cape Dorset has a vibrant arts scene, its building culture suffers a similar fate to other remote communities where new construction is low quality, expensive and architectural expression is “off the shelf”. TimberLink targets these issues through a simple, flexible prefabrication method that is achievable by locals rather than expensive imported labor.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Timberlink can be deployed at different scales, in different configurations, and for different circumstances. Infinite outcomes can be produced, either through the stacking of units or by means of a telescoping mechanism allowing unit assemblies to expand or contract.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Assembly process: enclosure and utility modules are produced off site, shipped, and assembled.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Modularization: each unit is structured around a cross laminate timber core.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Details: final assembly requires only simple tools and future changes can be done by locals.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Time sensitive: the second example of the system is for a Hurricane Sandy rebuild in Red Hook, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
In between space: by “tuning” the interlocked units to site, open space is provided at each level.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Interior: utilities in walls and floors allow the wood structure to be exposed and easily altered.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Flexible massing: the regularized system allows irregular arrangements specific to location.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Timberlink can be deployed at different scales, in different configurations, and for different circumstances. Infinite outcomes can be produced, either through the stacking of units or by means of a telescoping mechanism allowing unit assemblies to expand or contract.
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building …
Project entry 2014 North America – Timber-Link: Interlocking panelized timber building system, Cape Dorset, NU, Canada
Jonathan Enns.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
The proposed network of flood control infrastructure is finely calibrated to absorb specific volumes.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
Poreform is a concrete surface capable of rapid water absorption to prevent urban flooding. The surface feeds water to subterranean basins, like the Downtown Tank shown here. The surface is located within the public realm and claims a stake as civic infrastructure that is as important as its nearby sister, the Hoover Dam.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
Las Vegas loses 74,000 megaliters (60,000 acre-feet) of rainfall to the shallow aquifer per year in the form of urban runoff, the result of frequent major flooding. At the same time, the city is spending precious energy pumping water uphill from Lake Mead to the newest suburbs, and from the deeper principal aquifer to offset what is lost to runoff. Downtown floods because all detention basins are located in the suburbs. We propose a system of smaller basins for the dense downtown to encourage strategic growth.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
Las Vegas undervalues its water and is facing a detrimental shortage in the near future.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
Flood control basins located downtown will feed a primary basin, the Downtown Tank.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
Poreform functions as a surface, curb drain, foundation, small basin and collection tank.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
The Downtown Tank generates hydroelectric power to offset urban growth.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
The surface of Poreform is influenced by the Thorny Devil Lizard and erosion control construction.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
The Downtown Tank is a place of public awareness and education.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
The Downtown Tank is a place of cultural versatility and a community partner.
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean …
Project entry 2014 North America – Poreform: Water absorptive surface and subterranean basin, Las Vegas, NV, USA
Amy Mielke, Caitlin Gucker-Kanter Taylor
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
Inside view of the park. Event boxes are closed, leaving room for a more peaceful ambience.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
Aerial view in the early morning.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
View of the dynamic event boxes inside the park, around the forest landscape.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
External view from the street: the forest is protected by the event boxes
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
The night market: event boxes opening from the opposite side, creating a rich night atmosphere.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
Event boxes built from wood stacks as a symbol of Seattle’s identity.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
Aerial view of the masterplan: a forest landscape protected with a delimited by the boxes.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
Extract from movie detailing technology innovation elements of the running surface on top of the boxes.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
Landscape: longitudinal cross-section.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
The program concept of the event boxes generating cafés, library, micro-theater, sport facilities, etc.
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – In-Closure: Public park and interactive wall for urban revival, Seattle, WA, USA
Etienne Feher, Paul Azzopardi and Noé Basch, ABF-lab architects - engineers, Paris, France
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Divining LA tool prototype: subsurface infiltration potential.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Overview diagram, the Divining LA tool prototype: “Where is it? Let’s (re)Use It”: a fine-scaled geospatial modeling tool for strategically reassessing urban stormwater resources.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Divining LA tool prototype: mobile app demonstration, high-resolution stormwater runoff assessment.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Divining LA tool prototype: stormwater runoff model.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Divining LA tool prototype: infiltration constraint analysis.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Divining LA tool prototype: stormwater runoff infiltration resultant analysis.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Divining LA tool prototype: sub-watershed prioritization analysis.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Divining LA tool prototype: typology of urban stormwater infiltration strategies.
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Divining LA: Digital tool for urban design and water-use planning, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Peter Arnold and Hadley Arnold, Arid Lands Institute, Woodbury University, Burbank, CA, USA; Ethan Dingwell and Karim Snoussi, Arid Lands Institute, Woodbury University, Burbank, CA, USA
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
A view from a neighboring building shows the open air atrium and the garden spaces provided.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
The site is seen in red along the coast of San Francisco. The concept of an elevated street allows for a dense, mixed footprint. In yellow are important contextual landmarks. The program diagram shows the approximate size and composition of each “program block” inserted along the parking ramp. Their composition is based on logical immediate adjacencies in the vertical direction, and an even distribution of program along the ramp: thus creating the street without forgoing functional efficiency.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
A day lighting study provided the rules for removing a central portion of each floor plate, utilizing the most efficient sun angles throughout the day. An open air atrium is created serving to develop an experiential quality that does not seek to hide the former infrastructure, but instead glorify its natural aesthetics. The folded plate music hall is then visually connected both outside and in: sitting in the unavoidable shadow lines of adjacent buildings.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
Public gardens are located on the upper levels to alleviate the hardscaped urban environment.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
Wind currents off the water are used in stack ventilation. The program blocks are seen in elevation.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
The entry lobby to the music hall shows the use of existing structure as architectural detail.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
New openings throughout the structure connect programs like the art gallery and restaurant seen here.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
Vertical adjacencies create immediate connections while distributing programs along a continuous path.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
The back of house stacks vertically, connecting green room, backstage and more via private elevator.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
The music hall takes advantage of the existing floor levels to create balcony seating.
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a …
Project entry 2014 North America – Evolutionary Infrastructure: Adaptive reuse of a parking structure for cultural activities, San Francisco, CA, USA
Mark Turibius Jongman-Sereno, Mira Irawan, and David O’Brien.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
50 tons of household waste is collected daily and processed into raw material per category.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
The CHUW prototype in the East Village. The facility belongs to a new neighborhood ecology of household waste management. Collection and transportation methods, frequency of distribution, material recovery, and energy generation are all reconsidered. By having a presence in the city, the CHUW encourages a relational understanding of value between used goods and traditional resources (energy, heat, etc). Residents participate through convenient drop-off interaction and fabrication workshops.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
A machine for turning trash to treasure: the CHUW vertically integrates waste processing and local manufacturing. From street level, compact electric trucks deposit collections four times a day. Pickers and conveyors bring the sorted waste to their respective levels for further sorting and baling. Each type of baled material then moves along the storage façade to a manufacturing floor where local fabricators have direct access to raw materials. Unused materials are sold throughout the city.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
Economic and environmental benefits of waste recovery via renewable energy and material resource.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
Employee lounge and public community garden sit above the collection/drop-off floor on street level.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
(l) Aluminum processing and manufacturing floors, (r) paper processing and manufacturing floors.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
(l) Exploded model view from 14th St & 1st Ave, (r) sectional view showing programmatic stacking.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
(l) Truck drop-off and sorting prep, (r) sorting and manufacturing spaces behind storage façade.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
Plasma gasification and compost rooftop, (b) all non-recyclable material is gasified into energy.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
(a) Truck and pedestrian drop-off on ground floor, (b) picking conveyors lead to vertical conveyor core.
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility …
Project entry 2014 North America – Trash for Use: Municipal center for harvesting utility from waste, New York, NY, USA
Debbie Chen.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
A captivating experience for summer music events.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Hy-Fi is a new paradigm for design and manufacturing, with almost zero waste, zero embodied energy, and zero carbon emissions. It is a compostable structure that offers a new vision for society’s approach to physical objects and the built environment.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
The new structure built in the courtyard of MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program from June until September 2014 is in contrast with New York City’s typical brick buildings in Queens and the steel-and-glass buildings of Manhattan.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Organic brick made of corn stalks and mushroom roots.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Branching circular towers.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Temporarily diverting the natural carbon cycle to make a building, then return it to the cycle.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Production cycle involving no waste and no energy.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
A tall occupiable structure as a test of this new building material and method.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
A gravity-defying effect with lightweight brick construction.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY
Natural dye creates a structure with natural white on the outside and warm red on the inside.
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New …
Project entry 2014 North America – Hy-Fi: Zero carbon emissions compostable structure, New York, NY, USA
David Benjamin.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
Estimated growth of electricity storage capacity in USA by 2050.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
The key concept of the proposal is to utilize abandoned or soon to be abandoned underground coal mining sites as potential site to install hydro-pump electricity storage system. The project intends to emphasize the dual function of land, acting as a machine=power generator and simultaneously be an accessible destination for people. From both perspective of “landscape” and “infrastructure”, the project explores the boundary of the two and attempts to juxtapose them with elaborated spatial design.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
Section image illustrating the contrast of what is happening above surface and below surface; “tranquil waterfront environment” versus “hardcore power plant” underground. What is unique about the proposed waterbodies is that water circulation speed is extraordinarily fast. Due to the daily cycle of circulating water for electricity storage purpose, waterbodies fill-up and discharge all the water within a day, and repeat the cycle daily, thus bringing a dramatic landscape to visitors.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
GIS and geographical analysis of USA power grid system and coal mining operation.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
Macro scale site description, West Pennsylvania, and the layout of underground mine at project site.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
System plan, highlighting five waterbodies and infrastructural network.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
System operation and rendered view during the night: water to be slowly introduced to ponds.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
System operation and rendered view during morning hours: ponds to be fully filled with water.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
System operation and rendered view during evening: water to be fully flushed to generate electricity.
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump …
Project entry 2014 North America – Machine Landscape: Coal mining sites for hydro-pump electricity storage, Greene County, PA, USA
Adaptable system; this proposal is a flexible design strategy that can be adapted to other sites.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Based on the botanical mechanism of the algae, the algae pod unit can have a purifying airflow.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Pleura Pod is a wall that is composed of multiple layers that are made out of natural or recycled materials. The layers are designed not only to increase the sustainability function of the wall, but also to visually represent the aesthetic aspect of the wall. Even though the schematic design of the wall was based on the notion of sustainability, the ambition was to convey these ideas through an aesthetically developed piece of architecture.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
The algae in the individual pods consume carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air from the exterior surroundings and produce oxygen (O2) for the interior space through connected hoses. This process is visually transparent to occupants for their observation. The entire process is automatically controlled by electronic device in order to control the accurate air purification process. Architectural components become not only the part of structure, but also where nature exists.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
After the air from air bags goes into the algae pod, clean air will be supplied to the interior.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
The elevation reveals the mechanism by exposing every element through transparent material.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Pleura Pod is a sustainable wall which is mechanically composed of multiple layers.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Each component is made from natural or recycled materials and redesigned based on each function.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Digital representations are produced in order to predict how the public could engage with the wall.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Every layer of the wall is fabricated either digitally or manually with light-weight parts.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Each bag is electronically programmed and controlled in order to supply the right amount of O2.
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon …
Project entry 2014 North America – Pleura Pod: Air purification wall transforming carbon dioxide into oxygen, Cambridge, MA, USA
Beomki Lee, Suk Lee and Daeho Lee.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Model study process: three different formworks were tested and a hybrid fish wire and latex sheet formwork was developed.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Phase 01, a new construction method study. Ephemeral Concrete explores a sustainable concrete wall panel construction method, finding a creative way to produce exterior concrete panels efficiently. The shape of the concrete panel wall is thin and curved to create a vertical frame.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Phase 02, possible applications of the concrete panel for building. Reaching out to the sea, a sustainable fish market uses curved concrete panels for exterior walls based on the research of the first phase of the Ephemeral Concrete project. The main program of this building is a fish market. Two different flows, industrial and people, overlap in one building.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Instruction of the final method: a light-weight and reusable formwork.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Final model making process. Mock-up model using fish wire and latex sheet.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Possible application of the concrete panel. Building a spatial sequence with the concrete wall panel.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Physical models. Possible application of the concrete panel.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Possible application of the concrete panel for building. Elevation, section and plan.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Render image and plan.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Render image and plan.
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction …
Project entry 2014 North America – Latex Formwork: Concrete wall panel construction method, Cambridge, MA, USA
Namjoo Kim.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Urban infill: A sustainable model for mixed-use housing in the built- up city.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
The project creates an affordable, sustainable new model for residential development in a dense urban infill site. The project includes 4 micro-units and 6 adaptable family lofts. FSC wood framing, shaft and party walls sequester 32 M tons of CO2. The building uses mobile app and social media networks integrated with efficient building systems to create a user culture that supports local sustainable services. Construction cost is USD 2,360/m2 at 50% CD’s, meeting the developer’s ROI goals.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
The project integrates an innovative and adaptable unit design using available light, sun and water with low carbon wood construction framing, shaft and party walls. Efficient building systems support a sustainable ownership culture that extends to green business in the city. Physical and digital building networks are linked by design. NEST app is configured to minimize energy use and maximize energy savings. A smart building app manages resources and promotes local urban food and bike networks.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Street life: A layered façade.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Wrought iron façade: CNC fabrication process.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Wood construction.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Natural light and ventilation.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Micro-unit living.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Adaptable lofts.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
Multi-tasking maisonettes.
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban …
Project entry 2014 North America – Chrysanthemum Building: Affordable residential urban infill development, Boston, MA, USA
The Chrysanthemum Building team.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
Spadina Crescent is one of three significant public spaces on campus that break from the city grid.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
The complete DFALD restores the architecture, landscape and urban design within the round of Spadina Crescent. The east façade and green space frame a plaza oriented towards the University of Toronto campus. The silhouette of the building reflects the strategies of daylighting, structure and ventilation. The site’s hydrology is evident in the roof profile, shaped to guide water into pools, bio-swales and ultimately to cisterns for irrigation.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
The new wing engages its counterpart through a tripartite section of renovated office space, flexible auditorium and new design studios/workshops. These zones are linked by circulation, seating and aperture elements that intensify the building’s use and expand its influence into the landscape. Using the logic of the Firth of Forth Bridge, the new roof is shaped to create opportunities for stormwater collection, stack ventilation, radiant cooling and daylighting of the large studio floor plate.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
The “street” links campus to the neighborhoods, punctuated by a café and other public programs.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
Extensions into the landscape connect the building and a circumferential walk around the circle.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
New program elements plug into the existing U-shaped wing, optimizing flexibility and adaptability.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
Inter-disciplinary learning is aided by access and views among classrooms, studios and event spaces.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
High open space and abundant natural light support the collaborative studio culture.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
Design strategies maximize fresh air ventilation, effective day lighting and stormwater harvesting.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
The envelope maintains optimal 40% of glazed and solid walls with 2 low-e coatings on all windows.
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and …
Project entry 2014 North America – Heritage Reframed: University building renovation and extension, Toronto, ON, Canada
Nader Tehrani and Katherine Faulkner.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
The undulating berm in East River Park will rise 15 feet to provide flood protection and connect coast and community. It will support diverse new plantings, provide enhanced prospects on the park, and create social spaces. Existing sports fields will be maintained. Wide landscaped bridges will connect the East River Park to the community.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Reprogramming: Dark spaces below highways are turned into urban community areas.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Lower east side north: section and bird's eye view.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Two flip-down bridges in Chinatown: in the event of flooding, the flip-down gates can be shut down and the space behind them stays protected and dry.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Reverse Aquarium and Harbor Middle School.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
The Dryline was developed by a team of specialists working hand in hand with the end-users through a collective approach including stakeholders and users throughout the design process. Partnered with LESReady! (a coalition of more than 25 community groups coordinating planning efforts for the Lower East Side neighborhood in Manhattan), a series of public outreach work sessions with community end-users were conducted. Residents were invited to build their own resilient waterfront through drawings and interactive models with an array of options for creating a collective vision for their waterfront.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Considering The Dryline is an urban intervention in predominantly a public park setting, it is inherently a low-energy and low-carbon project. One primary component of the design is the flood protection system for which it was attempted to utilize a passive earthen levy approach.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Inspired by the hull of a ship, Manhattan's coastline is divided into different flood compartments - if one compartment is breached, the whole ship won't sink.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
The three components the make up BIG U: BIG Bench, Battery, and Berm.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
BIG Bench flood protection is designed as if it were street furniture: attractive, fun, practical.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Flip-down flood gates double as an art installation or enclosure for a winter market.
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
Global finalist entry 2015 - The Dryline: Urban flood protection infrastructure
The Berm increases much-needed park space and connectivity; the highways now hinder pedestrian access.
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection …
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York, NY, USA
The meandering protective BIG Bench creates unique spaces for socializing.
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection …
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York, NY, USA
How can the mandate of large-scale protective infrastructure with meaningful community engagement be obtained? How can the requirements of a “Robert Moses” hard infrastructure combined with the local community-driven sensitivity of Jane Jacobs be manifest? BIG U contains a protective ribbon: 21 km (13 mi) of flood protection tailored to each neighborhood and the community it serves.
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection …
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York, NY, USA
View of BIG U from The Battery in the financial district. Berms are strategically located to protect the infrastructure below and create a protective upland landscape. The plan envisions a new maritime/environmental education facility. Flood protection in this zone protects USD 1.9 billion in potential damages (NPV), including infrastructure beneath. The system has a benefit-cost ratio greater than 5.0.
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection …
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York, NY, USA
Abandoned underpass becomes public space, activated by a continuous band of flood defense/amenities.
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection …
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York, NY, USA
Dark parking lots beneath highways become an urban marketplace.
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection …
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York, NY, USA
New urban civic amenities add public space and do not fear the elements; they embrace them!
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection …
Project entry 2014 North America – Rebuild by Design: Urban flood protection infrastructure, New York, NY, USA
The international team.
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